Improving the availability of information on rights and participation of community stakeholders

News

The UNDP Equator Initiative brings together the United Nations, governments, civil society, businesses and grassroots organizations to acknowledge and advance local sustainable development solutions for people, nature and resilient communities. As local and indigenous groups across the world chart a path towards sustainable development, the Equator Initiative recognizes their efforts by honouring them with the biennial Equator Prize.


The Equator Initiative has created a case study database documenting the project catalyst, key activities and innovations, impact and sustainability, successes and challenges of all Equator Prize winners in the past 10 years. UN Online Volunteers helped translate the case studies from English to the local languages of the winners. “By translating these case studies into local languages, we have improved the availability of information on rights and participation of community stakeholders (in particular the disadvantaged)” says Eva Gurria from the Equator Initiative.

The UNDP Equator Initiative brings together the United Nations, governments, civil society, businesses and grassroots organizations to acknowledge and advance local sustainable development solutions for people, nature and resilient communities. As local and indigenous groups across the world chart a path towards sustainable development, the Equator Initiative recognizes their efforts by honouring them with the biennial Equator Prize.


The Equator Initiative has created a case study database documenting the project catalyst, key activities and innovations, impact and sustainability, successes and challenges of all Equator Prize winners in the past 10 years. UN Online Volunteers helped translate the case studies from English to the local languages of the winners. “By translating these case studies into local languages, we have improved the availability of information on rights and participation of community stakeholders (in particular the disadvantaged)” says Eva Gurria from the Equator Initiative.


Liza Haslan Tan proofread the Uma Bawang Resident’s Association (Malaysia) case study in Bahasa. “As English is not our mother tongue in Malaysia, it is important that the findings from this case study are able to reach the community so that they can benefit from it and perhaps be more enthusiastic to participate in future case studies,” she states. Liza holds a Bachelor’s degree in Biomedicine and various Masters degrees in areas such as Gerontology & Rehabilitation Studies, Health Management and International Public Health. She currently works for the United Nations University - International Institute of Global Health (UNU-IIGH).


Online volunteer Evelyine Amassi Hema Mussah translated the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust (Kenya) case study from English to Swahili. To proofread her translation, she also received help from her colleagues, a lecturer from a Tanzanian University, and a former UN Volunteer from Malawi. “I feel proud to contribute to my fellow African people who are struggling for their life improvements and for their current and future community development. In turn, online volunteering has influenced my life positively: it has enabled me to join hands with a global team and has improved my working capacity, knowledge and skills”. Evelyine has completed various Diplomas in Health Studies, Tropical Animal Production, Animal Health Sciences and a certificate in General Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences. She is from Tanzania and currently lives in Malawi, where is studying towards a Master's in Business Administration.


Abdulla-Al-Masum Helal, who proofread the Chunoti Co-Management Committee (Bangladesh) case study in Bengali, is an online volunteer currently finishing an M.A. in Applied Linguistics. In addition to being Executive Member in National Youth Leadership Forum under Ministry of Youth and Sports, Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, he is an advisor of a university based organization for voluntary blood donors, “I thought this assignment would be a great opportunity for my native people to learn about a precious approach that is appreciated globally and which might inspire them to participate in more developmental activities”.


Nominations are now open for the 2014 Equator Prize.


For more information on UN Online Volunteers, please visit the UNV Online Volunteering service website.