News
19 May 2017
Europe and Central Asia

The Republics of Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan, and the Russian Federation have a longstanding culture of volunteerism. As volunteering takes center stage, more people become aware and interested in creating vibrant volunteer infrastructures, further evidencing the region’s culture of cooperation.

Kazakhstan Repatriates
Through a state programme, the Government of Kazakhstan encouraged the repatriation of ethnic Kazakhs. A former repatriate himself, UN Volunteer Nurbakhit Atan (front, left) advised more than 500 repatriates and conducted joint volunteer actions in the Ulan district. (UNV, 2011)

Mr. Toily Kurbanov, Deputy Executive Coordinator, United Nations Volunteers (UNV) will visit Baku, Astana and Moscow from 22 to 26 May. During his mission to the region, Mr. Kurbanov will meet partners within government, volunteer involving organizations and academia, to discuss support to volunteerism in the region.

“Our UN Volunteers play a crucial role in Kazakhstan, reaching out to communities at the grass-root level, bringing innovations and empowering people. They are the real ‘experts for change’, a combination of outstanding inspiration and commitment,” states Mr. Norimasa Shimomura, UN Resident Coordinator and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Resident Representative in Kazakhstan.

UNV contributes to peace and development through volunteerism worldwide. By working with communities around the world, UN Volunteers support international law, peace, economic development, social progress and climate action.

“We welcome UNV’s return to Azerbaijan and its engagement with the Government of Azerbaijan and development partners to promote volunteerism for achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals,” states Mr. Ghulam M. Isaczai, UN Resident Coordinator in Azerbaijan. 

Mr. Kubanov will also deliver a keynote speech at the research symposium on volunteerism organized jointly by UNV and the Higher School of Economics (HSE) University in Moscow. The two-day symposium focuses on why collaborative research and knowledge exchange that spans multiple regions is needed to convey the message that achieving the Sustainable Development Goals is not possible without the everyday contribution of volunteers.

“UN Volunteers embody the fundamental values of commitment, inclusiveness, engagement and solidarity,” Mr. Kurbanov underlines.

In the last decade, 9 individuals from Azerbaijan, 77 from Kazakhstan and 88 from the Russian Federation served as UN Volunteers and contributed to the work of the United Nations.

These visits contribute to UNV’s objective of promoting volunteerism as a valuable instrument for sustainable development and increasing opportunities for UN Volunteers in the region.